Submission Open for IJEER Volume-3, Number-10, October 2019 | Submission Deadline- 20 October, 2019

International Journal for Empirical Education and Research

Storm Surge Causes and Different Variations

Author: Park Mao Ph.D. | Published on: 2017-10-31 19:40:49   Page: 1-10   212

Abstract
A storm surge, storm flood or storm tide is a coastal flood or tsunami-like phenomenon of rising water commonly associated with low pressure weather systems (such as tropical cyclones and strong extra-tropical cyclones), the severity of which is affected by the shallowness and orientation of the water body relative to storm path, as well as the timing of tides. Most casualties during tropical cyclones occur as the result of storm surges. It is a measure of the rise of water beyond what would be expected by the normal movement related to tides. The two main meteorological factors contributing to a storm surge are a long fetch of winds spiraling inward toward the storm, and a low-pressure-induced dome of water drawn up under and trailing the storm's center.

Keywords
Extra Tropical Storms; Measuring Surge; SLOSH; Mitigation; Reverse Storm Surge.

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Mao, P. (2017), Storm Surge Causes and Different Variations. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research, 1(2), 1-10.

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    Mao, P. (2017) "Storm Surge Causes and Different Variations", International Journal For Empirical Education and Research, 1(2), pp.1-10.

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    Mao, P.. Storm Surge Causes and Different Variations. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research. 2017; 1(2): 1-10.

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    Mao, P.. Storm Surge Causes and Different Variations. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research. 2017; 1(2): 1-10.

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    Mao, P.. Storm Surge Causes and Different Variations. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research. 2017; 1(2): 1-10.

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  • Reference

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    Author Details


    Park Mao Ph.D.
    School of Life Sciences
    Tianjin University
    maopark125@yahoo.com