Submission Open for IJEER Volume-3, Number-10, October 2019 | Submission Deadline- 20 October, 2019

International Journal for Empirical Education and Research

Tornado & its Shape, Size, Rotation, Sound & Seismology

Author: Sylwester Nowicki | Published on: 2017-11-30 18:31:14   Page: 1-18   279

Abstract
A tornado is a rapidly rotating column of air that is in contact with both the surface of the Earth and a cumulonimbus cloud or, in rare cases, the base of a cumulus cloud. The windstorm is often referred to as a twister, whirlwind or cyclone, although the word cyclone is used in meteorology to name a weather system with a low-pressure area in the center around which winds blow counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern. Tornadoes come in many shapes and sizes, and they are often visible in the form of a condensation funnel originating from the base of a cumulonimbus cloud, with a cloud of rotating debris and dust beneath it. Most tornadoes have wind speeds less than 110 miles per hour (180 km/h), are about 250 feet (80 m) across, and travel a few miles (several kilometers) before dissipating. The most extreme tornadoes can attain wind speeds of more than 300 miles per hour (480 km/h), are more than two miles (3 km) in diameter, and stay on the ground for dozens of miles (more than 100 km). Various types of tornadoes include the multiple vortex tornado, land spout and waterspout. Waterspouts are characterized by a spiraling funnel-shaped wind current, connecting to a large cumulus or cumulonimbus cloud. They are generally classified as non-super cellular tornadoes that develop over bodies of water, but there is disagreement over whether to classify them as true tornadoes. These spiraling columns of air frequently develop in tropical areas close to the equator, and are less common at high latitudes. Other tornado-like phenomena that exist in nature include the gust ado, dust devil, fire whirl, and steam devil.

Keywords
Funnel Cloud; Size and Shape; Appearance; Rotation; Sound and Seismology; Electromagnetic, Lightning, and Other Effects; Super Cell Relationship; Formation; Maturity; Dissipation; Types; Tornado Climatology; Visual Evidence; Tornado Preparedness.

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Nowicki, S. (2017), Tornado & its Shape, Size, Rotation, Sound & Seismology. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research, 1(3), 1-18.

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    Nowicki, S. (2017) "Tornado & its Shape, Size, Rotation, Sound & Seismology", International Journal For Empirical Education and Research, 1(3), pp.1-18.

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    Nowicki, S.. Tornado & its Shape, Size, Rotation, Sound & Seismology. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research. 2017; 1(3): 1-18.

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    Nowicki, S.. Tornado & its Shape, Size, Rotation, Sound & Seismology. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research. 2017; 1(3): 1-18.

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    Nowicki, S.. Tornado & its Shape, Size, Rotation, Sound & Seismology. International Journal For Empirical Education and Research. 2017; 1(3): 1-18.

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    Author Details


    Sylwester Nowicki
    Faculty of Geographical & Geological Sciences
    Adam Mickiewicz University
    nowickisylwester765@yahoo.com